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Artists

For Artists

We welcome enquiries by email from artists who may be interested in exhibiting in our gallery.  Please send at least three examples of your work in jpeg format, and we will get back to you. Contact Us

Participating Artists

ALEXANDRA BUCKLE

ALEXANDRA BUCKLE

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Alexandra takes her inspiration from countryside walks. She enjoys capturing the light, shadow and colour of her favourite scenery as hand printed reduction linocuts. Her work is popular on the Artfinder and Print Solo websites, where she has sold nearly 300 works internationally in just over two years.
Alexandra has been a full-time professional printmaker since 2012, creating a studio at her home in Bicester to enable her to develop her skills to the highest standards and teach her regular private lino printing workshops to novices and professionals alike.
Alexandra is committed to promoting printmaking in all its forms, but especially keen to demonstrate that lino cutting, although perfect as a simple beginner’s medium, can also be complex and technically challenging.

Alison Vincent

Alison Vincent

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Alison Vincent is a UK based glass artist focusing on hot glass – both hand blown and sculpted. She has trained through individual tuition and hiring studios across the UK and by attending masterclasses with some of the UK’s best glass artists.

She came to glass from a prior 30+ year background in design and development and established a consumer goods packaging development consultancy which she ran for 18 years.

She favours substantial, statement art pieces.

Her inspiration comes from her love of nature, especially water and ice - coastlines, waves, oceans and ice bergs and mountains. In particular oceans and polar wilderness locations and the amazing life, sheer raw beauty and treasures they contain.

Graham Lester

Graham Lester

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Graham Lester has worked with paper as a medium for many years and has been commissioned to produce paper sculptures for display work and many promotions. He now focuses on using the medium to express his creative ideas. He has demonstrated paper sculpture in John Lewis and other venues as well as exhibiting in Wales, the West Country and locally.
Graham also produces turned art using a variety of recycled materials including paper, acrylics and Corian bonded together and turned on the lathe into decorative bowls and pots.
Hilary Audus

Hilary Audus

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Hilary Audus specialises in animal sculptures and has an especial love of birds. All her pieces are built using the traditional coil technique in stoneware clay. In some of her pieces she uses the technique of scriffiito - drawing directly into the slip before the first firing. She then paints coloured glazes into the drawn line before firing the piece for a second time.
For most of her career Hilary has been employed in the Animation industry, eventually working her way up through the business to the post of Director.
Hilary was an animator and boarder on "The Snowman" and co-wrote "The Snowman and The Snowdog". Her film work has won several major International Awards, including BAFTA.
Ian Scott Massie

Ian Scott Massie

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I am an artist who portrays the personality of places in watercolour and screen print.

I believe that art makes people feel better - by looking at it, by making it and by learning the stories behind it.

I've been making and teaching art for over 40 years and its brought me so much pleasure and made my life richer than I could ever have imagined. I live in Masham in the Yorkshire Dales with my artist wife Josie Beszant. The front of our home is the Masham Gallery (run by Josie since 1994 and the main outlet for my work). We share another part of our home with Happy House Masham. This is a space online and in real life where we examine and practice what makes humans happy.

Jason Hicklin

Jason Hicklin

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Jason Hicklin’s work captures the feel of the weather and light and its effect on the landscape. All of Jason’s work is begun outdoors. Carrying the minimum of equipment, he will walk and climb the desired area for days and sometimes nights, often in extreme weather. He describes working outdoors in these tense and exciting conditions as a tremendously connecting experience – feeling a part of the land itself. The result is a striking record of the elemental collisions between earth, sea and weather. He conveys the bleak essence of driving rain, when the mist closes down, and masters the polarities of bright skies and shadowed rocks. His work is charged with an atmosphere born of an intimate knowledge of the landscape and a direct physical experience of its changing moods.
Jason was born in Wolverhampton in 1966 and studied at St. Martins College of Art, where he was a student of renowned printmaker Norman Ackroyd. After completing a postgraduate course at the Central School of Art in 1991, Jason combined working as Ackroyd’s studio assistant and editioner with producing his own work and teaching printmaking at City and Guilds of London Art School.
Jason is currently Head of Printmaking at City and Guilds. He was elected a member of the Royal Society of Painting and Printmakers in 1993 and has had numerous solo and joint exhibitions in the UK and abroad.
Kathryn Acton

Kathryn Acton

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Kathryn Acton is a printmaker specializing in screenprints and reduction linoprints. She takes inspiration from nature, British landscapes and places she has visited in Western USA, China, Greece and elsewhere and likes to abstract shapes and colours to create her distinctive prints.
Kathryn taught for many years and during her teaching career discovered with her students the joys and unexpected and surprising results of the printing process.

Together with her husband Paul, Kathryn runs Claydon Gallery at Claydon Estate, Middle Claydon.

MARIA WOJDAT

MARIA WOJDAT

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Maria's early creative training and work was in graphic design, this was a time when the industry was changing from drawing boards to computers. As her work became more computer based she realised she missed using her hands and making things, that realisation led her to ceramics and eventually an MA in ceramic design at Bath Spa University. Since graduating she has exhibited nationally and internationally and now works from her studio in Bath.


She is quite experimental in her process and likes to explore different ways of making, constantly seeking new and better ways to achieve her ideas. She mainly hand builds and at the moment she makes cylinders, a geometric form, which she then cuts, slices, re-joins and shapes to create forms which are more organic. It is the process of working in this way and seeing the form emerge that holds her attention - it is important to her that this is a slow process giving her the opportunity to assess and make changes to shape and line as the piece develops. She use colour to divide and segment the surfaces - once bisque fired the pieces are masked and sprayed with vitreous slips, each colour having a separate firing.

Paul Acton

Paul Acton

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After a career as a landscape architect and urban designer, including nine years as a member of the South-East Regional Design Panel, Paul discovered stone carving and has been committed to it ever since.
Paul carves mainly abstract, semi-abstract and occasionally figurative pieces in a range of stone types including limestone, sandstone, marble, soapstone and alabaster. He enjoys the act of carving, the ring of the stone, the feel and even the distinctive smell of different types of stone. It is a totally engrossing activity.
He loves stone and is endlessly fascinated by the challenge of carving it and revealing the hidden qualities of this hard old material that was created millions of years ago and will long outlast us.

Peter Austin

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Peter has exhibited in galleries throughout England including the Royal West of England Academy and the Royal Academy. Originally from Dorset he studied painting at Bournemouth College of Art. In 1962, following the award of a Travelling Scholarship, he went to live and paint in southern Sweden. In 2006 he ended forty year career in art education and returned to painting full-time.
Much of Peter Austin's work has been about places he knows well: the coasts of Dorset and Cornwall, Southern Sweden and also the Caribbean, but more recent work has been made in response to a wider range of subject matter, often prompted by memories of times, places and experiences.
About the work seen here he says:
"In early 2020 I had come to the end of a series of paintings and had begun the process of selecting and preparing for two exhibitions - which were subsequently cancelled!
This provided an opportunity for a lengthy period of reflection at the end of which I decided that I had come full circle and that if I was to avoid repeating the same images - as so many painters seem to do - I needed to think about a new direction. But I also felt it was important to retain some sense of continuity.
I have never been one of those painters who begins a work by drawing out a composition and then colouring it in. Neither do I keep a sketchbook by the side of my easel with a drawing to copy.
The paintings that I think of as the "Atacama" series happened simply because I saw that I had some colours that I had never used before. I though it would be interesting to see what happened if I did. I didn't begin by deciding that I would make some paintings about being in the Atacama desert in Chile.
The two "winter" paintings are a common theme. I have always enjoyed the melancholy of a bleak, desolate place. I enjoy the feeling of being quite alone in an empty landscape, of looking at a horizon and wondering what might be beyond. "

R & B CERAMICS

R & B CERAMICS

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Richard started his artist career at Bradford College of Art, where he studied as an Interior Designer prior to starting work as such for Samuel Smiths Brewery in Tadcaster. He returned to university at Bretton Hall to retrain as a teacher. His first teaching job he was put in charge of a ceramics department and so started a lifetime love affair with the material. In 2003 he left full time teaching and returned to university to complete a degree in glass and ceramics at Buckinghamshire University.
Carol trained as a nurse after an education in England, USA and Germany. Her interest in clay started at an evening Access to Art and Design course and developed into a love of making - both on the wheel and hand building.
Carol and Richard began a working partnership around 2010. The resulting ceramic art is a fusion of both their skills, contributing to each others work and creating new work together. Their ceramics are as varied as the British climate - work being both sculptural and functional, life size to miniature, Raku to High fired porcelain.
Rod Craig

Rod Craig

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‘Watercolour painting is a perfect medium for capturing the energy and the drama of the landscape, I love its vibrancy and fluidity. Whilst it is extremely challenging, it is completely addictive as no other medium offers the same degree of spontaneity. Most of my work is inspired by memories, music and the elements of the landscape.'

Although Rod has painted since childhood, he switched to being a full time artist in 2010 after a long career in design. He now divides his time between Bath and Woodstock motivated by the contrast between city life and the Oxfordshire countryside. He has work in collections in UK, Germany and New York and exhibits regularly.

Rosemary Wright

Rosemary Wright

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Rosemary loves the whole process of making things, from the research, the planning, sourcing of materials, the designing and the process, the physical interactions with the material, concluding with embellishment and finish.
As an organic living material wood develops its own structure and character that changes comparatively rapidly in response to its environment. Given the intrinsic role trees play in all of life and its semi-living status as wood, she approaches each piece she is going to use with respect. The material chosen must be appropriate for the product and she needs to use her best endeavours to ensure the design and finish enhance the material.
She prefers the simple to the complex; form, balance and elegance must always outweigh decoration. While she strives for simplicity the close-grained pale woods such as sycamore, maple or hornbeam are enhanced, she believes, by contrasting elements such as colour or carved texture. Bolder, coarser grained woods, such as ash, oak and elm lend themselves to different treatments such as charring, liming or texturing to exploit the variations in the alternating porous and denser growths of spring and summer. Knots, burrs or bark inclusions are inevitable in most woods and can be exploited rendering a more rustic “naturalistic” product.
Inspiration is all around us in the natural and manmade world. A soaring piece of architecture, the elegant curve of a leaf, a simple tea bowl, weathered rock or peeling paint can all seed ideas. She seems to be drawn to geometric simplicity, flashes of contrasting colour or plain matte surfaces when decorating objects.
She has been working with wood professionally for over twenty years now having spent the first half of her working life as a biochemist. She participated in the last ever Chelsea Craft Fair in 2005 and the first ever “Origin” exhibition organised by the Crafts Council in 2006 and had her first solo exhibition at the Open Eye Gallery in Edinburgh in 2006 and has since been exhibiting in galleries throughout the UK. She has work in collections in both the UK and the US.
Simon Griffiths SWLA

Simon Griffiths SWLA

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Simon Griffiths is a sculptor living and working in the North Pennines.
As a child, he spent as much time as
possible in the woods and fields near
his home, exploring and drawing the creatures that lived within them, especially the animals and birds.
His sculpture comes from within him and he has spent many years experimenting with different techniques and materials.
His work primarily stems from direct observation of the subject. The stylistic and constructional considerations are secondary to portraying the subject as honestly as he can. This is not to say that he strives to make his work realistic in the literal sense, instead he seeks to capture that sense of awareness that is present in all living things.